Windows

Info | Options

Window Options

We install CR Laurence windows of the following types. Window prices vary between $200 and $700. We charge $600 per window to install. Fill out our service request form for a complete estimate. 

Fixed Window

No opening or vent. Typically goes on either the sliding door or behind the driver’s seat.

T-Vent Window

Vents lift up and down on both sides using a knob inside. Comes with screens. Typically goes on either the sliding door or behind the driver’s seat.

Rear Door Window

Installed on one or both of the rear doors of the van.

Half-Slider Window

Slides to vent. Includes screen. Universal – can be put in many different locations on your van, driver or passenger side. Typically goes above the bed in the back of the van, on one or both sides.

Awning Bunk Window

Vents using a knob inside. Includes screen. Universal – can be put in many different locations on your van, driver or passenger side. Typically goes above the bed in the back of the van, on one or both sides.

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Want our opinion?

We’re happy to give it to you.

How many windows should I get? 

We recommend at least one vented window near the sleeping area of the van, and one large window on the passenger sliding door of the van. This is for safety and visibility reasons.

Do I really need at least one vented window? 

Yes. One vented window is essential for comfortable and healthy sleeping for you and your van. Your vent fan (also essential!) needs somewhere to draw air. Without a vented, you won’t have any real airflow even with the fan running. This means not only hot and stuffy sleeping, but also condensation build-up inside the van which leads to eventual rust, mold, and other problems.

Which type of vented windows are best? 

Visually, the awning style bunk window looks very attractive from the outside – it’s sleek! However, it doesn’t open as far or allow as much airflow as the half-slider window.

Some people prefer the flat opening of the half-slider, as opposed to the awning which will stick out when open.

They both work, so it’s ultimately a matter of personal preference.

How hard is it to install the windows myself? 

Because of the high stakes involved in cutting a large hole in your van and successfully sealing a giant sheet of glass to that hole, almost all our DIY customers don’t want to do their own windows. A lot can go wrong.

If you have a deep personal desire to learn autobody, however, we empower you to do that! We made this video a few years ago when we helped a friend install his window. This video is informational and not a replacement for a professional install, but it will give you a few tips if you want to take a crack at it. If you choose to install the windows yourself, we assume no responsibility for the outcome of your install.

 

Request service or get an estimate

Know what you need? Use the button below. We’ll get you an estimate and set up your service.

Want more? Visit the DIY Shop for a full list of our services.

Our Trusted Partners

How do you decide what’s right for you?

Our three biggest tips as you’re building about your van:

  • Do your research
  • Know what you want
  • Know your budget

This sets you up for success. You’ll know what features you need and which ones you don’t. You’ll end up with a van that works for you and your lifestyle – not anyone else’s. Because that’s what vanlife is all about – freedom to be yourself, travel on your own terms, and enjoy the natural world without the typical hassles of camping or limitations of RVs.

Our specific tips for DIYers 

Some of our customers decide to DIY their van for the love of building. Some want to increase their skills. Others do it for financial reasons. Our DIY shop is designed to help those converting their own vans with the features beyond their skillsets.

The holy trinity of any construction job is: fast – cheap – high quality. You can have two out of three, but never all three at once. A conversion shop like ours provides quality services at a fast pace—but it will cost you money. If you have a reasonable skill level and access to YouTube, you can DIY your dream conversion and save money—but it will cost you time. Fast and cheap naturally signifies a drop in quality.

Many DIY customers come to us after they’ve been working on their vans for years and realize they need help. Others devote six months to the project and complete it with great success.

The key: get real with yourself in terms of your priorities. Decide what’s worth outsourcing to professionals and what you can do on your own. Whenever you’re looking to save costs, prepare to either spend a substantial amount of time on your build or sacrifice quality. If you’re stuck in the rut of endless tinkering and perfectionism, it might be time to speed up and either spend some extra money and lower your standards just a little. We never suggest cutting corners when it comes to such a major investment—but there’s also wisdom to the saying “done is better than perfect.”